Aiming High: A One-Armed Player Keeps His Dream of Going Pro Aiming High: A One-Armed Player Keeps His Dream of Going Pro

30 Aug , 2018

An electric shock cost Robert Whitaker Jr. his left arm as a child, but he’s never lost his determination to play pro basketball

"Watching Whitaker Jr. play basketball is like viewing a magician's trick. Something is happening, that you're sure of, but your eyes can't believe it. When he has the ball in his hand, his handles are as smooth as a swan, zipping the ball from left to right and front to back with ease. He attacks the rim, barreling toward the basket with no regard for his life or body. There's nothing left to fear. On the court he has a commanding presence, running the offense and instructing teammates during breaks in play. He can move off the ball, play on-ball defense and make passes that would populate social media on any given night. "He knows the game. He's a very smart player," said Jon Solomon, Whitaker Jr.'s manager. "He just knows how to play." There are of course questions about his jumper. How can a person grip, balance and aim a basketball when two hands are necessary for each act? Michael "Troy" Hamlett, a youth basketball coach in Jacksonville, was the only coach who wanted Whitaker Jr. on his recreational league team after the accident. He drafted the one-armed boy while he was still lying in a hospital bed." For more, please click here.  

An electric shock cost Robert Whitaker Jr. his left arm as a child, but he’s never lost his determination to play pro basketball

"Watching Whitaker Jr. play basketball is like viewing a magician's trick. Something is happening, that you're sure of, but your eyes can't believe it. When he has the ball in his hand, his handles are as smooth as a swan, zipping the ball from left to right and front to back with ease. He attacks the rim, barreling toward the basket with no regard for his life or body. There's nothing left to fear. On the court he has a commanding presence, running the offense and instructing teammates during breaks in play. He can move off the ball, play on-ball defense and make passes that would populate social media on any given night. "He knows the game. He's a very smart player," said Jon Solomon, Whitaker Jr.'s manager. "He just knows how to play." There are of course questions about his jumper. How can a person grip, balance and aim a basketball when two hands are necessary for each act? Michael "Troy" Hamlett, a youth basketball coach in Jacksonville, was the only coach who wanted Whitaker Jr. on his recreational league team after the accident. He drafted the one-armed boy while he was still lying in a hospital bed." For more, please click here.